32 Replies to “The other Nobel winner”

  1. mahendrap,

    After the ODI fiasco following hot on the heels of the twenty20 hype, Indica euphorotica did badly need a pick-me-up. And Dr. Pachauri has provided it — as a standby until the next really glamour figure comes along.

  2. mahendrap,

    After the ODI fiasco following hot on the heels of the twenty20 hype, Indica euphorotica did badly need a pick-me-up. And Dr. Pachauri has provided it — as a standby until the next really glamour figure comes along.

  3. Vivek: You’re of course right. There were two parts to this.

    One was how extremely well-read folk like Shefaly failed to read about the other joint-winner, in this case, the IPCC. This shows about how the media focused its attention on the celebrity-in-focus, Al Gore, while completely sidelining the Nobel Committee’s other joint-awardee.

    Second, how the Indian media and public, as a result of a draught in euphorotica (nice term), draws the attention of Indians to the committee’s Indian chairman, rather than the committee and its supporting scientific network comprising of over 2500 scientists!

  4. Vivek: You’re of course right. There were two parts to this.

    One was how extremely well-read folk like Shefaly failed to read about the other joint-winner, in this case, the IPCC. This shows about how the media focused its attention on the celebrity-in-focus, Al Gore, while completely sidelining the Nobel Committee’s other joint-awardee.

    Second, how the Indian media and public, as a result of a draught in euphorotica (nice term), draws the attention of Indians to the committee’s Indian chairman, rather than the committee and its supporting scientific network comprising of over 2500 scientists!

  5. Mahendra: This is a game where both parties – western media and Indian media – are playing their part to perfection. The game is called celeb-hunting! Now an Olympic level sport.

  6. Mahendrap: if I may return your compliment, I like the expression “draught in …”. When there is a drought, nothing like a draught to get high on!

  7. Mahendrap: if I may return your compliment, I like the expression “draught in …”. When there is a drought, nothing like a draught to get high on!

  8. Shefaly,

    The way the Indian media go about creating celebs, I would not be sorry to see the celebs hunted to extinction. Also the media, for that matter.

  9. Shefaly,

    The way the Indian media go about creating celebs, I would not be sorry to see the celebs hunted to extinction. Also the media, for that matter.

  10. Vivek: Anybody who thinks their country’s media obsession with celebrity is out of control is welcome to visit the UK and find themselves trumped in every possible way. But it sells papers and in a free market, if celeb tat is what consumers want, well that is what they get!

  11. Vivek: Anybody who thinks their country’s media obsession with celebrity is out of control is welcome to visit the UK and find themselves trumped in every possible way. But it sells papers and in a free market, if celeb tat is what consumers want, well that is what they get!

  12. Mahendra,

    // … extremely well-read folk like Shefaly failed to read about … //

    With no disrespect to Shefaly, she seems to be part of a rather sizeable group afflicted by a mild condition called NRItis 🙂 . I have a sister in Australia who suffers from it. Once, when she was visiting India, she accompanie me to a major meeting where one of the distinguished participants was Medha Patkar (with whom I could, in those days, claim a nodding acquaintance). I introduced my sister, and Medha was suitably polite. To my great surprise, my sister (who is herself active in the aboriginal rights movement in Australia, and not exactly loved by the whites there for that reason) not only did not register who she was being introduced to, she had not even heard of the Narmada Bachao Andolan or the Right Livelihood Award.

  13. Mahendra,

    // … extremely well-read folk like Shefaly failed to read about … //

    With no disrespect to Shefaly, she seems to be part of a rather sizeable group afflicted by a mild condition called NRItis 🙂 . I have a sister in Australia who suffers from it. Once, when she was visiting India, she accompanie me to a major meeting where one of the distinguished participants was Medha Patkar (with whom I could, in those days, claim a nodding acquaintance). I introduced my sister, and Medha was suitably polite. To my great surprise, my sister (who is herself active in the aboriginal rights movement in Australia, and not exactly loved by the whites there for that reason) not only did not register who she was being introduced to, she had not even heard of the Narmada Bachao Andolan or the Right Livelihood Award.

  14. Vivek:

    With no disrespect to Shefaly, she seems to be part of a rather sizeable group afflicted by a mild condition called NRItis

    With no disrespect, I think many people in India currently suffer from holier-than-thou-itis, small-sample-base-generalisation-itis and poor-attribution-itis. None of these is a mild form of anything.

    Ignorance of specifics is no crime; being ignorant of that ignorance is.

    The fragmented Indian media and their poor quality analysis play a key role in enabling what you call NRIitis. People living abroad have to turn to western media to get a sense of what is happening. The gaps are filled through conversations with those people living in India, whose judgement may appear reliable. Keen ones go a step further and do their own research into matters.

    Those, who are intellectually honest enough, go on their own blogs and apologise for their oversight. Only to find out that all people wish to remember is what they forgot to notice and suddenly it is a full-blown disorder, euphemised by adjectives such as ‘mild’!

    It is also true that for many people, specialisation is both a conscious choice and an escape from the information overload that the internet has wrought.

    Just because your sister works with aborigines in Australia, she cannot reasonably be expected to know everything about an environmental cause in India.

    My academic guide, who is a climate change specialist, does not pretend to know anything about my case study of obesity. He has no qualms about my consulting other experts to learn.

    So I am afraid, much as I respect your age and your contributions, I take exception to such generalisations. Random slurring is not a great way to win an argument.

    Thanks for your time.

  15. Vivek:

    With no disrespect to Shefaly, she seems to be part of a rather sizeable group afflicted by a mild condition called NRItis

    With no disrespect, I think many people in India currently suffer from holier-than-thou-itis, small-sample-base-generalisation-itis and poor-attribution-itis. None of these is a mild form of anything.

    Ignorance of specifics is no crime; being ignorant of that ignorance is.

    The fragmented Indian media and their poor quality analysis play a key role in enabling what you call NRIitis. People living abroad have to turn to western media to get a sense of what is happening. The gaps are filled through conversations with those people living in India, whose judgement may appear reliable. Keen ones go a step further and do their own research into matters.

    Those, who are intellectually honest enough, go on their own blogs and apologise for their oversight. Only to find out that all people wish to remember is what they forgot to notice and suddenly it is a full-blown disorder, euphemised by adjectives such as ‘mild’!

    It is also true that for many people, specialisation is both a conscious choice and an escape from the information overload that the internet has wrought.

    Just because your sister works with aborigines in Australia, she cannot reasonably be expected to know everything about an environmental cause in India.

    My academic guide, who is a climate change specialist, does not pretend to know anything about my case study of obesity. He has no qualms about my consulting other experts to learn.

    So I am afraid, much as I respect your age and your contributions, I take exception to such generalisations. Random slurring is not a great way to win an argument.

    Thanks for your time.

  16. Touche, Shefaly! (how does one enter an accent aigu in a comment box?) I thought you were unflappable, but did manage to provoke you. A smiley wasted, unfortunately. And I did not even realise I was into an argument, let alone being out to win it. 🙁

  17. Touche, Shefaly! (how does one enter an accent aigu in a comment box?) I thought you were unflappable, but did manage to provoke you. A smiley wasted, unfortunately. And I did not even realise I was into an argument, let alone being out to win it. 🙁

  18. Vivek:

    I usually use a symbol insert from Word, but I do not know how to make an accent grave on WordPress. I should learn.

    I am unflappable usually, still am, but I have slept for 4 hours. Perhaps I should just be pleased that I am still able to make cogent arguments, since I am still slaving over the final chapter of the thesis..

    An argument as in “a discussion in which reasons are advanced for and against some proposition or proposal” not an argument as in “a dispute where there is strong disagreement”… I assume you are still in the argument in the former sense.

    Thanks and yes, I do hear that NRI-thing often and it is very irksome. I love a good argument and debate, but not where tax-and-mortgage-paying location is used as a basis for discounting much else that is said.

    Thanks.

  19. Vivek:

    I usually use a symbol insert from Word, but I do not know how to make an accent grave on WordPress. I should learn.

    I am unflappable usually, still am, but I have slept for 4 hours. Perhaps I should just be pleased that I am still able to make cogent arguments, since I am still slaving over the final chapter of the thesis..

    An argument as in “a discussion in which reasons are advanced for and against some proposition or proposal” not an argument as in “a dispute where there is strong disagreement”… I assume you are still in the argument in the former sense.

    Thanks and yes, I do hear that NRI-thing often and it is very irksome. I love a good argument and debate, but not where tax-and-mortgage-paying location is used as a basis for discounting much else that is said.

    Thanks.

  20. Dear Vivek,

    I love your coinage of new terms.

    However, I am not sure what you’re trying to comment on, regards this post and its topic. I myself have written a post on this, and it seems Shefaly disagreed from my viewpoint, but at least, we’re still on the topic while commenting on each others post. That’s what leads to a productive argument or discussion.

    //The way the Indian media go about creating celebs, I would not be sorry to see the celebs hunted to extinction. Also the media, for that matter.//
    I too would love celebs to be hunted to extinction! But not the media. I would hate the Indian media to be hunted to extinction. Sorry if I did not understand you.

    //With no disrespect to Shefaly, she seems to be part of a rather sizeable group afflicted by a mild condition called NRItis. I have a sister in Australia who suffers from it.//
    Like Shefaly, I too am not surprised by your sister not knowing about Narmada Bachao Andolan. If your emotional wish is that even when Indians leave the country for good, they should still be aware of the happenings in their country of origin – I take it for what it is – an emotional wish.

    Unlike Shefaly, I am unaware of your age. However, like her, I too take exception to generalizations. For the precise reason how they can ignore and hurt others who are exceptions to those generalizations.

    //Let’s let this argument rest until you’ve finished your final chapter and are well rested.//
    I would be willing to bet that whatever this argument was about, I don’t think it is going to be resumed, even well after Shefaly has completed her thesis and is well rested.

  21. Dear Vivek,

    I love your coinage of new terms.

    However, I am not sure what you’re trying to comment on, regards this post and its topic. I myself have written a post on this, and it seems Shefaly disagreed from my viewpoint, but at least, we’re still on the topic while commenting on each others post. That’s what leads to a productive argument or discussion.

    //The way the Indian media go about creating celebs, I would not be sorry to see the celebs hunted to extinction. Also the media, for that matter.//
    I too would love celebs to be hunted to extinction! But not the media. I would hate the Indian media to be hunted to extinction. Sorry if I did not understand you.

    //With no disrespect to Shefaly, she seems to be part of a rather sizeable group afflicted by a mild condition called NRItis. I have a sister in Australia who suffers from it.//
    Like Shefaly, I too am not surprised by your sister not knowing about Narmada Bachao Andolan. If your emotional wish is that even when Indians leave the country for good, they should still be aware of the happenings in their country of origin – I take it for what it is – an emotional wish.

    Unlike Shefaly, I am unaware of your age. However, like her, I too take exception to generalizations. For the precise reason how they can ignore and hurt others who are exceptions to those generalizations.

    //Let’s let this argument rest until you’ve finished your final chapter and are well rested.//
    I would be willing to bet that whatever this argument was about, I don’t think it is going to be resumed, even well after Shefaly has completed her thesis and is well rested.

  22. Mahendra,

    //I too would love celebs to be hunted to extinction! But not the media. I would hate the Indian media to be hunted to extinction. Sorry if I did not understand you.//

    I meant the kind of media that mindlessly create the celebs. In the Ahmedabad edition of the Times of India that is my daily fare, You could easily change the page numbering to 3A, 3B, 3C, … Ed., Op-Ed, … 3X-b, 3X-a, 3X.

    //If your emotional wish is that even when Indians leave the country for good, they should still be aware of the happenings in their country of origin – I take it for what it is – an emotional wish.//

    It’s not an emotional wish. I would expect someone who’s involved in human rights-related issues to be at least superficially aware of similar issues around the world. And of the Right Livelihood award.

    About generalisations, mea culpa! Wrong sampling.

    Thanks for your expression of appreciation about coining terms. The fact is, words have their own fascination for me, and playing with them within and across languages is an entertaining pastime. BTW, if such things interest you I would strongly recommend Shefaly’s link to “Fun for pedants and linguists”

  23. Mahendra,

    //I too would love celebs to be hunted to extinction! But not the media. I would hate the Indian media to be hunted to extinction. Sorry if I did not understand you.//

    I meant the kind of media that mindlessly create the celebs. In the Ahmedabad edition of the Times of India that is my daily fare, You could easily change the page numbering to 3A, 3B, 3C, … Ed., Op-Ed, … 3X-b, 3X-a, 3X.

    //If your emotional wish is that even when Indians leave the country for good, they should still be aware of the happenings in their country of origin – I take it for what it is – an emotional wish.//

    It’s not an emotional wish. I would expect someone who’s involved in human rights-related issues to be at least superficially aware of similar issues around the world. And of the Right Livelihood award.

    About generalisations, mea culpa! Wrong sampling.

    Thanks for your expression of appreciation about coining terms. The fact is, words have their own fascination for me, and playing with them within and across languages is an entertaining pastime. BTW, if such things interest you I would strongly recommend Shefaly’s link to “Fun for pedants and linguists”

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