A Passage To India (2010 ed) and the other R-word

When EM Forster wrote A Passage To India, the Indo-British relationship was one of the ruler and the ruled, of imbalances in power. Things are different now in 2010. Britain lags behind and grapples with an economic crisis of monstrous proportions, while India’s economic growth gallops along at 8.5%.

Naturally, all eyes are on David Cameron and his 90-strong high-powered ministerial and CEO delegation to India, billed as a “jobs tour” to which Cameron is bringing a “spirit of humility“.  The delegation led by Mr Cameron confirms how India remains, despite all its frustrations, a potentially strategic customer, partner, supplier and sometimes a competitor to British businesses. As such India’s growth has direct implications for British business, as we in Britain seek growth markets and profits to deal with the continued chill in our home economy.

Earlier this week, the Financial Times, in its editorial, argues that India needs to go for stronger growth (registration required). Among other points, the FT argues for improved infrastructure and productivity, liberalisation in retail sector, furthering liberalisation in the banking sector, and investment in basic health and education.

All valid points indeed.

A fundamental requirement to enable such business is that businesspersons from both countries are able to travel to meet with each other, and not just on high profile trade delegations. Not least because both the UK and India  are nations thriving on the back of the SME sector and their chief executives rarely get to join ministerial trade delegations.

Travel between India and the UK is hamstrung: by the increasingly onerous requirements for an Indian to obtain a British visa in India, and by the sheer volume of visa applications being made by British persons in the UK for travel to India. One area ripe for quick and major reform in both countries is enablement of business travel.

In doing so, the other R-word – reciprocity – is as important as any reform. It would not be remiss of Mr Cameron’s and Dr Singh’s governments to take bold steps to make it easier for British and Indian businesses to travel, and then to trade and collaborate.

Starting with a mutually cooperative visa regime. One that makes it easier for British businesses to find their passage to India in the modern times.

Other links:

Nitin Pai writes: Cameron comes with a different mindset

BBC’s Economics editor Stephanie Flanders: Osborne in India

Dean Nelson on the whys and the what-fors of Indo-British links

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