On fitness

What I hear:

“I do not have time.”

“I get plenty exercise at work/ with children/ with the commute.”

“I do not need exercise; look, I have no weight to lose!”

“I do not eat a lot; I do not need exercise.”

“My mother and grandmother did not; why should I?”

“I have no motivation to go running on cold rainy mornings.”

“I have an old injury.” (This one always perplexes me, especially coming from those who have never done a minute’s strenuous work-out in their lives.)

“Are you calling me fat??”

What I say:

If you are in your 20s or 30s, chances are your body has to carry you for a good 50-60 years.

Does your body today look like it could make that journey for the next 50-60 years with you?

If yes, what are you doing to maintain it? If not, what can you change today to ensure you can indeed make it last the distance?

Good enough for you?

17 thoughts on “On fitness

  1. Well, depends on what you consider a 40 year old man fit for! 😀
    In most ways, it is not too late, but getting into modern shape is, indeed, difficult because of logistics and motivational issues, as you know too well.

    Like

  2. Well, depends on what you consider a 40 year old man fit for! 😀
    In most ways, it is not too late, but getting into modern shape is, indeed, difficult because of logistics and motivational issues, as you know too well.

    Like

  3. Rambodoc: Thanks! I cannot judge really. Because to judge would require imagination and to quote Nora Ephron (courtesy a friend), “Every decade of life has been the failure of my imagination!”. 🙂

    But yes, you are right. It is never too late to make changes.

    I posted this here because in my recent experiences, I have found this argument to be quite powerful with people, who have every excuse in the book for not exercising, and a rather unwieldy sense of their own immortality and an unfounded confidence they will never face morbidity.

    However I am puzzled what you might mean by “modern shape”?!

    Thanks.

    Like

  4. Rambodoc: Thanks! I cannot judge really. Because to judge would require imagination and to quote Nora Ephron (courtesy a friend), “Every decade of life has been the failure of my imagination!”. 🙂

    But yes, you are right. It is never too late to make changes.

    I posted this here because in my recent experiences, I have found this argument to be quite powerful with people, who have every excuse in the book for not exercising, and a rather unwieldy sense of their own immortality and an unfounded confidence they will never face morbidity.

    However I am puzzled what you might mean by “modern shape”?!

    Thanks.

    Like

  5. I see. Well, fitness for a lifetime can be achieved with no gym kit, with exercises utilising body weight and technique. And if started early enough can benefit younger people too. In my gym I regularly saw young people on their first days, pumping iron like, er, Rambo might, and then collapsing because they did not know how to pace themselves! Thanks for reading.

    Like

  6. I see. Well, fitness for a lifetime can be achieved with no gym kit, with exercises utilising body weight and technique. And if started early enough can benefit younger people too. In my gym I regularly saw young people on their first days, pumping iron like, er, Rambo might, and then collapsing because they did not know how to pace themselves! Thanks for reading.

    Like

  7. Rather late to comment on this post, but not by much.

    Here’s what Jack LaLanne (the 90-something man who gave his name to Bally Total Fitness clubs and had the most successful TV exercise show):

    “If you exercise for 25 to 30 minutes four to five days a week you can do a lot. It’s your health account. The more you put in the more you’ll be able to take out.”

    On the effort in exercise:
    “It’s a pain in the gluties,” says Mr. LaLanne of working out. “But you gotta do it. Dying is easy, living is tough. I hate working out. Hate it. But I like the results.”

    Here’s the article: (WSJ – regn reqd)
    https://online.wsj.com/article/SB119004434024629877.html?mod=hps_us_mostpop_emailed

    Like

  8. Rather late to comment on this post, but not by much.

    Here’s what Jack LaLanne (the 90-something man who gave his name to Bally Total Fitness clubs and had the most successful TV exercise show):

    “If you exercise for 25 to 30 minutes four to five days a week you can do a lot. It’s your health account. The more you put in the more you’ll be able to take out.”

    On the effort in exercise:
    “It’s a pain in the gluties,” says Mr. LaLanne of working out. “But you gotta do it. Dying is easy, living is tough. I hate working out. Hate it. But I like the results.”

    Here’s the article: (WSJ – regn reqd)
    https://online.wsj.com/article/SB119004434024629877.html?mod=hps_us_mostpop_emailed

    Like

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