Dying not to do exercise

Last week I wrote a post titled “On Fitness“. It has always amazed – and in some cases, amused – me to hear the long list of excuses presented by my adult friends for not doing any exercise.

New YouGov research shows that only 38% of British people would exercise if their life depended on it. And only 4% of adults find exercise fun, which is another way of saying that 96% do not find exercise fun. Body shape, looking good and fancying someone at the gym are found to be reasons motivating more people than the 13% of women and 4% of men who exercise to keep their hearts fit.

Is it that exercise gets bad, or worse, no press at all?

Or is it just that we are getting more and more inventive about our excuses to stay on the sofa?

Must fun be the decisive factor in everything before we choose to do it?

Is it wrong for me to wonder if we have our priorities totally upside down, or is it that society’s incessant search for hedonism really is beyond my comprehension?

More on today’s post on my other blog.

10 thoughts on “Dying not to do exercise

  1. I kind of shy from excuses when it comes to myself, I can easily make out when my views are just excuses. guess some times you got to be harsh on yourself.

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  2. I kind of shy from excuses when it comes to myself, I can easily make out when my views are just excuses. guess some times you got to be harsh on yourself.

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  3. Rambler: Thanks for your thoughts. I think most people recognise their own excuses, but whether they over-ride them with their actions is something else altogether.

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  4. If healthcare is less affective at extending and improving life that healthcare, as many studies show it is, what value do we get from healthcare spending that pays of things beyond vaccinations antibiotics and sanitation?

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  5. If healthcare is less affective at extending and improving life that healthcare, as many studies show it is, what value do we get from healthcare spending that pays of things beyond vaccinations antibiotics and sanitation?

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  6. I’ve been avoiding exercise because it felt lousy. Lately, I’ve been working on freeing up my breathing (expand the exhale, wait till inhalation happens spontaneously, repeat–and inhale through nose, exhale through mouth). It makes a large difference in how exerting myself feels.

    I wasn’t crazy to not want to exercise when I wasn’t getting much air.

    It’s *still* hard to get around to exercising, but at least I’m just fighting my habits rather than trying to make myself do something that feels bad.

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  7. I’ve been avoiding exercise because it felt lousy. Lately, I’ve been working on freeing up my breathing (expand the exhale, wait till inhalation happens spontaneously, repeat–and inhale through nose, exhale through mouth). It makes a large difference in how exerting myself feels.

    I wasn’t crazy to not want to exercise when I wasn’t getting much air.

    It’s *still* hard to get around to exercising, but at least I’m just fighting my habits rather than trying to make myself do something that feels bad.

    Like

  8. @ Nancy: Thanks for your note. I know since most people know Yoga as posture and poses (asanas), it is less common knowledge that a branch of Yoga, called Praanaayaam, is wholly focused on breathing. There are some easy-to-follow books on Amazon that may interest you.

    Re your breathing, you will be amazed at how many regular exercisers have to be told to keep breathing when they take up a new exercise such as boxing. Breathing is of course natural but to learn to breathe properly is a different ball-game, one that you have worked at.

    However this sort of self-motivation is less understood than the reasons why people do NOT exercise.

    Thanks for stopping by and sharing your experience.

    @ Floccina: Thanks for your note although I am not sure I understood it fully. So I am responding to the bit that I _do_ understand

    Historical accounts show that sanitation was a key development in changing the nature of public health statistics.

    But it worked on a principle, whose outcomes are less easy to demonstrate – prevention. It is for instance harder to say we saved 100 people from dying than to say we cured 100 people to ABC disease. (The reverse is also true. Mortality projections are always controversial!)

    So health services really function as “sickness services” rather than health.

    At an individual level, prevention also requires individual compliance with certain requirements, and that is where an individual’s motivation comes into the picture.

    If you would like to clarify what the first part of your note meant, I shall try to address that.

    Thanks for stopping by.

    Like

  9. @ Nancy: Thanks for your note. I know since most people know Yoga as posture and poses (asanas), it is less common knowledge that a branch of Yoga, called Praanaayaam, is wholly focused on breathing. There are some easy-to-follow books on Amazon that may interest you.

    Re your breathing, you will be amazed at how many regular exercisers have to be told to keep breathing when they take up a new exercise such as boxing. Breathing is of course natural but to learn to breathe properly is a different ball-game, one that you have worked at.

    However this sort of self-motivation is less understood than the reasons why people do NOT exercise.

    Thanks for stopping by and sharing your experience.

    @ Floccina: Thanks for your note although I am not sure I understood it fully. So I am responding to the bit that I _do_ understand

    Historical accounts show that sanitation was a key development in changing the nature of public health statistics.

    But it worked on a principle, whose outcomes are less easy to demonstrate – prevention. It is for instance harder to say we saved 100 people from dying than to say we cured 100 people to ABC disease. (The reverse is also true. Mortality projections are always controversial!)

    So health services really function as “sickness services” rather than health.

    At an individual level, prevention also requires individual compliance with certain requirements, and that is where an individual’s motivation comes into the picture.

    If you would like to clarify what the first part of your note meant, I shall try to address that.

    Thanks for stopping by.

    Like

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