8 thoughts on “DNA testing

  1. Shefaly, I heard this on the bbc today and in fact was just discussing it with my daughters. its difficult to believe isn’t it! and they say it is voluntary…well I guess its not really voluntary coz whoever refuses will probably not get in!

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  2. Shefaly, I heard this on the bbc today and in fact was just discussing it with my daughters. its difficult to believe isn’t it! and they say it is voluntary…well I guess its not really voluntary coz whoever refuses will probably not get in!

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  3. Nita: Thanks. This is extremely tricky – in many ways – to enforce. It will also face some predictable liberal criticism.

    France is part of the EU which means that anyone from EU can, in theory, find work and settle in France without any specific tests. France has also been a favourite destination of retirees from UK and other countries.

    Recently the enforcement of a 2006 law has begun. The law bars unemployed EU citizens from joining the French health system which as you know is universal access, albeit not free at the point of delivery as the UK’s is. Local authorities have leeway on interpretation so while in theory, rules will not affect those already covered by French healthcare, in practice all foreigners are getting the rough end of the stick.

    Although the law was passed before Sarkozy became President, there is a risk that this will be seen as part of his tough-on-immigration stance and policies.

    The DNA law in particular could potentially be challenged under many of the provisos under the European Union Fundamental Rights. Considering a lot of French immigrant traffic comes from their erstwhile North African colonies, this can be seen as blatant, state-sponsored racism.

    Europe in general is having a mass wobbly over immigration, mostly of Muslims (although largely Protestant nations in the EU are so different from the largely Catholic ones that this Christian-Muslim thing is just a small step ahead of that).

    So you see, a small law can be a giant step for the EU in many ways. If this goes unchallenged, nothing can stop other EU member states from enacting similar laws, a virtual portcullis in the face of immigration. Except I think the UK, which is now already suffering the brunt of its overly liberal immigration regime…

    I suppose we all have to watch this space.

    Thanks.

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  4. Nita: Thanks. This is extremely tricky – in many ways – to enforce. It will also face some predictable liberal criticism.

    France is part of the EU which means that anyone from EU can, in theory, find work and settle in France without any specific tests. France has also been a favourite destination of retirees from UK and other countries.

    Recently the enforcement of a 2006 law has begun. The law bars unemployed EU citizens from joining the French health system which as you know is universal access, albeit not free at the point of delivery as the UK’s is. Local authorities have leeway on interpretation so while in theory, rules will not affect those already covered by French healthcare, in practice all foreigners are getting the rough end of the stick.

    Although the law was passed before Sarkozy became President, there is a risk that this will be seen as part of his tough-on-immigration stance and policies.

    The DNA law in particular could potentially be challenged under many of the provisos under the European Union Fundamental Rights. Considering a lot of French immigrant traffic comes from their erstwhile North African colonies, this can be seen as blatant, state-sponsored racism.

    Europe in general is having a mass wobbly over immigration, mostly of Muslims (although largely Protestant nations in the EU are so different from the largely Catholic ones that this Christian-Muslim thing is just a small step ahead of that).

    So you see, a small law can be a giant step for the EU in many ways. If this goes unchallenged, nothing can stop other EU member states from enacting similar laws, a virtual portcullis in the face of immigration. Except I think the UK, which is now already suffering the brunt of its overly liberal immigration regime…

    I suppose we all have to watch this space.

    Thanks.

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  5. This is very interesting, though the BBC article was short on details. Looks like the negatives of immigrants have started to outweigh the positives, hence stricter policies. 🙂

    Were there a lot of cases where people were falsely claiming immigrants as their progeny? If 12 other European countries have already implemented this (and assuming there haven’t been any legal challenges), shouldn’t France be OK? I do think that ensuring a knowledge of French and their “values” (what does that entail? writing an essay after watching “La Peau douce” or “Irréversible”? :D) as a pre-requisite is a step in the right direction. I do believe that one should learn the language of the country where one is immigrating to – makes it easier to live.

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  6. This is very interesting, though the BBC article was short on details. Looks like the negatives of immigrants have started to outweigh the positives, hence stricter policies. 🙂

    Were there a lot of cases where people were falsely claiming immigrants as their progeny? If 12 other European countries have already implemented this (and assuming there haven’t been any legal challenges), shouldn’t France be OK? I do think that ensuring a knowledge of French and their “values” (what does that entail? writing an essay after watching “La Peau douce” or “Irréversible”? :D) as a pre-requisite is a step in the right direction. I do believe that one should learn the language of the country where one is immigrating to – makes it easier to live.

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  7. Amit: Thanks. There is evidence of Turkish migrants in Germany and now recently Polish migrants in the UK claiming benefits on their children both in their home country and in the new host countries. A recent Dispatches programme on Immigration (earlier this week) suggested that Portuguese immigrants to the UK are more likely than Asians to rely on state housing and benefits, illustrating how being an EU citizen may make them visibly similar but does not make them any more likely to work and contribute to society.

    So I can see why these policies are being proposed.

    However when the general public reacts, they do not react to nuances, they react to visible signs. Signs such as skin colour. On my very first visit to the US, many years ago, I was struck by the colourful diversity of people in Boston T. We are diverse but not nearly so but the din here would make you think we were crawling with immigrants (perhaps we are, but many are trafficked, many are illegal and so on, hence prefer to remain invisible).

    I have written earlier on some immigration related themes, particularly with regard to the enforceability of some proposed measures. I believe these were subsequently withdrawn.

    About the language issue, I cannot disagree however I do agree that “culture” is harder to define than “history” so stupidity becomes the order of the day. You should see some of the questions in the Britishness test!

    I also wrote about a rather telling conversation with a new Polish immigrant to the UK.

    As I mentioned in the post, social liberal thinking is an enduring British value. But recent abuses of the Human Rights of victims to protect criminals have got people hopping mad so we are ripe for a public discussion and/ or significant change here too.

    But none of this answers my question – what about adopted and step children?

    Thanks for stopping by. Do check out those links.

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  8. Amit: Thanks. There is evidence of Turkish migrants in Germany and now recently Polish migrants in the UK claiming benefits on their children both in their home country and in the new host countries. A recent Dispatches programme on Immigration (earlier this week) suggested that Portuguese immigrants to the UK are more likely than Asians to rely on state housing and benefits, illustrating how being an EU citizen may make them visibly similar but does not make them any more likely to work and contribute to society.

    So I can see why these policies are being proposed.

    However when the general public reacts, they do not react to nuances, they react to visible signs. Signs such as skin colour. On my very first visit to the US, many years ago, I was struck by the colourful diversity of people in Boston T. We are diverse but not nearly so but the din here would make you think we were crawling with immigrants (perhaps we are, but many are trafficked, many are illegal and so on, hence prefer to remain invisible).

    I have written earlier on some immigration related themes, particularly with regard to the enforceability of some proposed measures. I believe these were subsequently withdrawn.

    About the language issue, I cannot disagree however I do agree that “culture” is harder to define than “history” so stupidity becomes the order of the day. You should see some of the questions in the Britishness test!

    I also wrote about a rather telling conversation with a new Polish immigrant to the UK.

    As I mentioned in the post, social liberal thinking is an enduring British value. But recent abuses of the Human Rights of victims to protect criminals have got people hopping mad so we are ripe for a public discussion and/ or significant change here too.

    But none of this answers my question – what about adopted and step children?

    Thanks for stopping by. Do check out those links.

    Like

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