Inspiration from TED Talk

On the way back from pilates this morning, I was twirling ideas in my head. Once home, I got distracted by a tweet by Paul Kedrosky, a person of eclectic tastes and interests (which is why I read his blog; I find it difficult to like monotone, monochrome, mono-anything). Paul wrote about a TED talk by Ben Zander. Ben Zander is the British born conductor of the Boston Philharmonic Orchestra.

Following this piece till the end has its own rewards. The core message is ‘passion’ that drives life ahead, at work and outside it.

If you do not have 20 minutes to get inspired, well, I have nothing to say. Perhaps that itself is worth a reflection.

If you missed the link above, follow this link.

12 thoughts on “Inspiration from TED Talk

  1. Thanks for the heads up on the Ben Zander video! That post was somehow missed (I guess the title of it wasn’t interesting enough to me or something). Wasn’t familiar with him, but luckily I am now!

    Like

  2. Thanks for the heads up on the Ben Zander video! That post was somehow missed (I guess the title of it wasn’t interesting enough to me or something). Wasn’t familiar with him, but luckily I am now!

    Like

  3. I really think i’m not destined to watch this video… i felt it for download and went in for a meeting last night and when i came, the comp had killed itself again! So, this morning, i’ve started the download, hoping that at least today (a day that has begun disastrously!) i can be inspired! 🙂

    Like

  4. I really think i’m not destined to watch this video… i felt it for download and went in for a meeting last night and when i came, the comp had killed itself again! So, this morning, i’ve started the download, hoping that at least today (a day that has begun disastrously!) i can be inspired! 🙂

    Like

  5. I am not sure if “Passion” drives the life ahead. I think its “Passion” combined with “success achieved”. Don’t you think so?
    And, regarding the divorce bit, I think there is still a social stigma attached to it as far as India is concerned. The way people start gossiping is appalling.

    Like

  6. I am not sure if “Passion” drives the life ahead. I think its “Passion” combined with “success achieved”. Don’t you think so?
    And, regarding the divorce bit, I think there is still a social stigma attached to it as far as India is concerned. The way people start gossiping is appalling.

    Like

  7. Amit, good point about the success factor being necessary to sustain one’s passion. Success can be measured in countless ways: money (which shouldn’t factor in when dealing with true passion); the internal feeling one derives while engaged; external recognition; internal growth. And on and on…

    Like

  8. Amit, good point about the success factor being necessary to sustain one’s passion. Success can be measured in countless ways: money (which shouldn’t factor in when dealing with true passion); the internal feeling one derives while engaged; external recognition; internal growth. And on and on…

    Like

  9. @ 99ppp: Welcome to my blog. This is exactly the kind of point that earns me no friends 🙂 Other than the ones I already have. Introspection is not usually scheduled in the high-speed chase of economic growth in any country’s trajectory, not so far. If you know differently, do tell me.

    @ Lekhni: Marriage vows tie two people together to the exclusion of everyone else, and so it should remain till they separate by death or divorce. I believe only the people in a relationship know what goes on in there, what keeps it together, what tears it asunder. Others are merely observers of second-hand portrayals that the couple seeks to present. Ergo, no interference. Supporting without interfering requires us to give more of ourselves than we are prepared to. No?

    @ Amit: Is there a possibility to allow both to vent to you but not give an opinion to either?

    @ NFAH: Are you saying people isolate themselves by not talking at all? Hmm. That is a scenario I did not think of.

    @ Worth: Isn’t that video wonderful? I have not been so inspired in a long, long, long time. It made me want to aspire to be a speaker like him – with his comfort, his presence, his regaling abilities, his ease, his all-encompassing warmth and authenticity, his ability to keep the audience engaged.

    @ Nikhil: As of writing this, I know you have managed to see it and are very happy you could!

    @ Amit: In my experience, achievement is usually an outcome of passion. But passionate people do not necessarily succeed but then as Worth points out later, achievement or success itself could be defined many ways.

    @ QuirkyIndian: I find it hard to believe there are amicable divorces. Research suggests that couples often have shared memory, not memories, memory. Which is why people find themselves absent-minded and forgetful after divorce. They realise they had been using the spouse as back-up memory of some kind. I recently met someone who has his iPod but he cannot back-up his music because his ex-wife would not let him borrow his own CD collection or use the ex-family PC. I sent him to the Apple Genius bar and am wondering if this is a commonly posed question to them.

    On the other point, I agree 🙂

    @ Poonam: I am curious. How do you think would one _not_ get into such a situation? I have, what are called in IT speak, “legacy” friends. If they were to divorce, of course, I am in the middle of a mess. How can I not be in that mess?

    Here is a rough translation:

    When the Nazis came for the communists,
    I remained silent;
    I was not a communist.

    When they locked up the social democrats,
    I remained silent;
    I was not a social democrat.

    When they came for the trade unionists,
    I did not speak out;
    I was not a trade unionist.

    When they came for the Jews,
    I remained silent;
    I wasn’t a Jew.

    When they came for me,
    there was no one left to speak out.

    I know my most recent posts have been a melange. Mostly due to two reasons – I have not the time to write longer posts at the moment, although some are in draft and will be published sometime soon; and past posts show that my long posts get very few readers and even fewer people engage 🙂 Thanks for your note though.

    @ Usha: Ah, non-judgemental! A tricky word and a trickier behaviour. I have a friend who often says to me: “You know me; unlike others, I am not judgemental”. It makes me want to laugh out aloud. Can she not see? Declaring oneself non-judgemental in itself is an act of judgement. 🙂

    As I said, I hope not to find out what it is like to know both parties in a divorce. In case of one of the friends I mention, the spouse considered me almost a ‘best’ friend. But our philosophies differed so much that after the divorce, I am not in touch at all. There have been no attempts from the other side either.

    Like

  10. @ 99ppp: Welcome to my blog. This is exactly the kind of point that earns me no friends 🙂 Other than the ones I already have. Introspection is not usually scheduled in the high-speed chase of economic growth in any country’s trajectory, not so far. If you know differently, do tell me.

    @ Lekhni: Marriage vows tie two people together to the exclusion of everyone else, and so it should remain till they separate by death or divorce. I believe only the people in a relationship know what goes on in there, what keeps it together, what tears it asunder. Others are merely observers of second-hand portrayals that the couple seeks to present. Ergo, no interference. Supporting without interfering requires us to give more of ourselves than we are prepared to. No?

    @ Amit: Is there a possibility to allow both to vent to you but not give an opinion to either?

    @ NFAH: Are you saying people isolate themselves by not talking at all? Hmm. That is a scenario I did not think of.

    @ Worth: Isn’t that video wonderful? I have not been so inspired in a long, long, long time. It made me want to aspire to be a speaker like him – with his comfort, his presence, his regaling abilities, his ease, his all-encompassing warmth and authenticity, his ability to keep the audience engaged.

    @ Nikhil: As of writing this, I know you have managed to see it and are very happy you could!

    @ Amit: In my experience, achievement is usually an outcome of passion. But passionate people do not necessarily succeed but then as Worth points out later, achievement or success itself could be defined many ways.

    @ QuirkyIndian: I find it hard to believe there are amicable divorces. Research suggests that couples often have shared memory, not memories, memory. Which is why people find themselves absent-minded and forgetful after divorce. They realise they had been using the spouse as back-up memory of some kind. I recently met someone who has his iPod but he cannot back-up his music because his ex-wife would not let him borrow his own CD collection or use the ex-family PC. I sent him to the Apple Genius bar and am wondering if this is a commonly posed question to them.

    On the other point, I agree 🙂

    @ Poonam: I am curious. How do you think would one _not_ get into such a situation? I have, what are called in IT speak, “legacy” friends. If they were to divorce, of course, I am in the middle of a mess. How can I not be in that mess?

    Here is a rough translation:

    When the Nazis came for the communists,
    I remained silent;
    I was not a communist.

    When they locked up the social democrats,
    I remained silent;
    I was not a social democrat.

    When they came for the trade unionists,
    I did not speak out;
    I was not a trade unionist.

    When they came for the Jews,
    I remained silent;
    I wasn’t a Jew.

    When they came for me,
    there was no one left to speak out.

    I know my most recent posts have been a melange. Mostly due to two reasons – I have not the time to write longer posts at the moment, although some are in draft and will be published sometime soon; and past posts show that my long posts get very few readers and even fewer people engage 🙂 Thanks for your note though.

    @ Usha: Ah, non-judgemental! A tricky word and a trickier behaviour. I have a friend who often says to me: “You know me; unlike others, I am not judgemental”. It makes me want to laugh out aloud. Can she not see? Declaring oneself non-judgemental in itself is an act of judgement. 🙂

    As I said, I hope not to find out what it is like to know both parties in a divorce. In case of one of the friends I mention, the spouse considered me almost a ‘best’ friend. But our philosophies differed so much that after the divorce, I am not in touch at all. There have been no attempts from the other side either.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s