Four For Friday (19)

This week’s offerings include education, luxury, competitive advantage of nations, and the tragedy of the commons. But also sustainability, political economy, ethics, regulation. Oh well, just read on!

I get cautiously sceptical about a sector when MBAs and VCs start flocking to it but, despite the first line, this article on the interactive future of higher education is a good read.

Responsible Jewellery Council’s Code of Practice (PDF) is inviting comments from all stakeholders. If you have ever bought, worn or ogled at jewellery – or if you are concerned about conflict diamonds, reckless mining of precious metals and endangered resources such as corals – you should take a look and contribute. Open till September the 10th, 2012.

First movers can lose their advantage to unforeseeable factors. This story about India’s BPO and call centre industry losing its edge to Philippines. Why? Their natural accent.

And in a week that sees increasing strife and breakdown of trust between industry, regulators, legislators and the citizenry, read this brief refresher on Elinor Ostrom’s 8 principles for managing a commons. The Nobel laureate passed away on June the 12th, 2012.

4 thoughts on “Four For Friday (19)

  1. On the 3rd link: I think it’s simplistic. The accent was just one of the factors. Having been intimately involved with this industry in India for most of the golden years, and through the first part of the decline, I saw first hand the deleterious impact of govt. policies.
    Most Indian managers I know, believe that as long as the govt. ignores an industry, that industry will thrive. But once the govt. gets involved, they manage to screw up things in ways no one (including they) can predict. There are all kinds of stupid ideas, taxes, charges, regulations, which should never have seen the light of the day. But they did. And the Indian BPO industry paid a price, in terms of global competitiveness!
    Also read https://www.indianexpress.com/news/from-the-philippines-with-gratitude/927646/0

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    1. Thanks for your comment.

      Yes it is simplistic despite the title and despite the fact that the article does talk about some other structural factors (not taxation etc of course). Which is why it is a great conversation starter (I write this series not because it starts conversations but despite the fact that it doesn’t – outgoing links rarely being clicked on is I think the dirty little secret of blogging!)

      The view of Indian managers about government intervention is not unique to India. Industry everywhere believes that – until a calamity or unforeseeable disaster happens, when the verisame people claim it is because there was not enough oversight and regulation.

      Thanks for that link. Which I assure you I clicked through and read!

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  2. Apropos your comment:
    “The view of Indian managers about government intervention is not unique to India. Industry everywhere believes that – until a calamity or unforeseeable disaster happens, when the verisame people claim it is because there was not enough oversight and regulation.”

    True! But you should have seen the tinkering that GoI started doing in the IT/ITES space about 6 years ago…including stupidity like “if you outsource a critical business function to a captive Indian unit, you need to pay tax on global profits…in India” crap!

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