Pretty and other things about tech wading into luxury

I see a lot of chatter on Twitter about how some lollipop/ icecream/ sundae update on Android doesn’t work on this device or that from different manufacturers. Then there are the workarounds, the fixes that one needs to learn, and consequent boasts on Twitter. And the many exhortations to do factory reset and start from scratch.

And I wonder.

This is 2015.

I have been using a mobile phone for 20 years now.

A technology that is pervasive and unarguably central to our lives, like water and oxygen, needs to be easier than this Android malarkey. It needs to be low cognitive load. I think often and a lot about cognitive load because I research and teach masterclasses in better decision making. That is my beat. The decisions can cover a vast scope — from organisation design, to product design, to making it easy for a customer to find, buy and use the product.

My iDevices — the iPhone and the iPad in particular — are low cognitive load. The UI is intuitive, and the capacitive touch screen is sensitive and easy to use for older and younger persons alike.

Some may say these iDevices are dumbed down, and use derisive words such as Mactards (!) for people like me. Frankly I would rather use my cognitive surplus (thanks, Clay Shirky, for that wonderful coinage!) on things more productive than making my mobile phone work.

If one wishes to create a business or a product for high frequency or pervasive use, making it easy to use is essential.

Then there is designing for human follies. And real world use. And end-of-life considerations. In business speak, these are considerations for process and incentive design.

Have you ever lost an iDevice? Then again, have you ever lost any other mobile phone or connected device? Let me know how you got on with the latter!

Recently I have misplaced a device, and had a device stolen. The lost one was found because I could locate it and track its movement from the time the loss was registered with the authorities in charge to the time it was found and returned. The time one was stolen, at least I could trigger the remote wipe as soon as the thief tried to get in.

Insurance companies replace the device not they can not replace the data, which is far more valuable.

Which brings me to back-up and synchronisation.

Yes, the iTunes UI could be much improved. It is far from being the best showcase for user friendly design. But the back-up and synchronisation happen easily. Without much effort (or cognitive load, see above).

Then there is seamless recycling for old or end-of-life devices. Apple’s recycling partner agrees a sum of money during the online registration process. I wipe the data on the old devices and ship it free-of-charge to the recycling partner and receive the money. Apple is in compliance with the WEEE Directive in Europe. As a consumer, I am happy not to have old devices cluttering my shelves, and as a citizen, I am pleased I am not contributing to environmental garbage in the world.

JeanPaulGaultier_Barbican2014

Then there is pretty.

The iDevices are pretty. There is no getting away from it. I work in luxury. Pretty is luxury’s calling card. The iDevices fit the bill.

When a consumer spends a considerable chunk of money on one’s product, it behooves us as businesses to deliver a seamless, satisfying, low effort and pleasant consumer experience all round.

It is harder than it looks, it costs money, it needs a lot of imagination and profound understanding of the consumer’s journey with the business.But above all it takes commitment.

For the tech companies looking to play in the luxury or premium markets, there is a lot to learn from Apple. As well as from the fact that the best regarded luxury sector players demonstrate that serious commitment at every step of the customer’s journey with them. Those that don’t may not and often do not last. More’s the pity.

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